IQ, IQ Tests, Jobs By IQ, How Does It Matter?

surprisinglives.net/iq-tests-jobs/

IQ is a fascinating subject and one that is perhaps tested more than it should be for people’s own good. Nevertheless, the internet, as we all know, is a never-ending plethora of bullshit facts, well-researched articles and fascinating information to enhance our minds.

Since I’m a particular sucker for infographics and well-made lists the one below caught my eye.

It is very long which in itself is quite impressive. The subject is the average IQ of people who work in various occupations. Cool, I just couldn’t resist looking up the average IQ for all the jobs and careers that I had ever considered let alone worked.

Naturally, the list made an impression on me. So here it is in its entirety for all of you to scan. I’ll give you a few minutes and meet you at the bottom.

 

Average IQ represented by the people working in surveyed occupations: (Listed from highest to lowest IQ level.) 

Occupation IQ
1. Surgeon 234.1 obviously an error
2. Physician 161.1
3. Corporate executive 148.0
4. Psychiatrist 147.7
5. Dentist 140.0
6. Orthodontist 131.2
7. Podiatrist 129.1
8. Judge 127.9
9. Attorney 127.8
10. Petroleum engineer 126.1
11. Pharmacist 126.1
12. Physicist 124.9
13. Commercial airline pilot 124.9
14. Astronomer 124.5
15. Financial planner 122.8
16. Nuclear engineer 121.1
17. Optometrist 120.7
18. Aerospace engineer 120.2
19. Mathematician 119.8
20. Public relations executive 118.1
21. Economist 116.9
22. Actuary 116.9
23. Software engineer 116.9
24. Meteorologist 116.0
25. School principal 116.0
26. Physician assistant 115.6
27. Electrical engineer 115.2
28. Web developer 115.2
29. Construction foreman 114.8
30. Geologist 114.4
31. Veterinarian 114.4
32. Computer systems analyst 112.7
33. Mechanical engineer 112.6
34. Civil engineer 112.2
35. Industrial engineer 111.8
36. Biologist 111.4
37. Physical therapist 111.4
38. Statistician 111.0
39. Architect 111.0
40. Computer programmer 110.1
41. Occupational therapist 109.7
42. Sociologist 109.7
43. Chiropractor 108.9
44. Chemist 108.9
45. Stockbroker 108.6
46. Dental hygienist 108.4
47. Psychologist 108.0
48. Speech pathologist 107.6
49. Registered nurse 107.2
50. Historian 106.8
51. Technical writer 106.8
52. Occupational safety/health inspector 106.7
53. Audiologist 106.7
54. Market research analyst 106.4
55. Advertising account executive 106.3
56. Fashion designer 106.0
57. Philosopher 105.9
58. Accountant 105.5
59. Farmer 105.1
60. Industrial designer 104.7
61. Insurance underwriter 104.7
62. Telephone installer and repairer 104.6
63. Zoologist 104.2
64. Communications equipment mechanic 103.8
65. Loan officer 103.4
66. Purchasing agent 103.4
67. Engineering technician 103.4
68. Medical technologist 103.4
69. Author 103.0
70. Undertaker 103.0
71. Librarian 103.0
72. Surveyor 103.0
73. Railroad conductor 103.0
74. Conservationist 102.9
75. Anthropologist 102.5
76. Vocational counselor 102.5
77. Highway patrol officer 102.5
78. Aircraft mechanic 102.5
79. Respiratory therapist 102.5
80. Dietitian 102.1
81. Mail carrier 102.1
82. Motion picture editor 101.8
83. Sales representative 101.8
84. Publication editor 101.7
85. Archeologist 101.7
86. Physiologist 101.7
87. Stationary engineer 101.7
88. Teacher 101.7
89. Electrical equipment repairer 101.7
90. Newscaster 101.4
91. Tax examiner 100.9
92. Buyer 100.9
93. Police officer 100.9
94. Actor 100.8
95. Stenographer 100.5
96. Museum curator 100.5
97. Electrician 100.0
98. Bricklayer 100.0
99. Parole officer 100.0
100. Paralegal assistant 100.0
101. Tool-and-die maker 100.0
102. Insurance agent 99.7
103. Personnel recruiter 99.6
104. Hotel manager 99.6
105. Plumber 99.6
106. Architectural drafter 99.6
107. Firefighter 99.2
108. Set designer 99.2
109. Artist (fine art) 98.8
110. Industrial machine repairer 98.7
111. Advertising salesperson 98.4
112. Clergy 98.4
113. Sheet metal worker 97.5
114. Heating and refrigeration mechanic 97.5
115. Real estate agent 97.1
116. Photojournalist 97.1
117. Flight attendant 97.1
118. Construction machinery operator 97.1
119. Social worker 97.1
120. Sewage plant operator 97.1
121. Licensed practical nurse 97.0
122. Stevedore 96.6
123. Carpenter 96.6
124. Corrections officer 96.6
125. Choreographer 96.3
126. Automobile body repairer 96.2
127. Plasterer 96.2
128. Office machine repairer 96.2
129. Machinist 96.2
130. Truck driver 96.2
131. Carpet and tile installer 95.8
132. Drywall Applicator and finisher 95.8
133. Computer service technician 95.8
134. Nuclear decontamination technician 95.8
135. Glazier 95.4
136. Sailor 95.4
137. Medical laboratory technician 95.4
138. Automobile mechanic 95.0
139. Dental laboratory technician 95.0
140. Welder 94.9
141. Newspaper reporter 94.6
142. Jeweler 94.5
143. Meter reader 94.5
144. Roofer 94.5
145. Bus driver 94.5
146. Appliance repairer 94.5
147. Painter 94.5
148. Agricultural scientist 94.5
149. Ironworker 94.5
150. Machine tool operator 94.5
151. Broadcast technician 94.2
152. Piano tuner 94.1
153. Musical instrument repairer 94.1
154. Compositor/typesetter 94.1
155. Optician 94.1
156. Bookkeeper 94.1
157. Typist 94.1
158. Electrical technician 94.0
159. Garbage collector 93.7
160. Roustabout 93.7
161. Dairy farmer 93.7
162. Lumberjack 93.7
163. Bookbinder 93.3
164. Telephone operator 93.3
165. Medical records technician 93.3
166. Travel agent 93.3
167. Drill-press operator 93.3
168. Photographer 92.9
169. Emergency medical technician 92.8
170. Vending machine repairer 92.8
171. Furniture upholsterer 92.8
172. Forklift operator 92.8
173. Medical secretary 92.8
174. Construction worker 92.4
175. Butcher 92.4
176. Disc jockey 92.1
177. Precision assembler 92.0
178. Shipping and receiving clerk 92.0
179. Automobile assembler 91.6
180. Dressmaker 91.6
181. Photographic process worker 91.2
182. Receptionist 90.7
183. Barber 90.3
184. Guard 90.3
185. Nurse’s aid 90.3
186. Bank teller 90.3
187. Cosmetologist 89.9
188. Teacher’s aide 89.9
189. Shoemaker and repairer 89.9
190. Recreation worker 89.5
191. Janitor 89.5
192. Chauffeur 89.5
193. Taxi driver 89.0
194. Retail salesman 88.6
195. Childcare worker 88.2
196. Maid 88.2
197. Bartender 87.8
198. Waiter 87.8
199. Cashier 87.7
200. Dishwasher 87.7

Careercast: Jobs Rated Methodology 2011 Report.

amandaricks.com

Dolphins: known for their intelligence and I love them!

As a refresher and for interest sake here is the breakdown of how each IQ score is rated:

IQ Scores & Ratings

What is a good IQ score?  What is a high IQ score?  What is a low IQ score?  These are common questions, particularly after someone finds out their score from an IQ test.

Lewis Terman (1916) developed the original notion of IQ and proposed this scale for classifying IQ scores:

  • Over 140 – Genius or near genius
  • 120 – 140 – Very superior intelligence
  • 110 – 119 – Superior intelligence
  • 90 – 109 – Normal or average intelligence
  • 80 – 89 – Dullness
  • 70 – 79 – Borderline deficiency
  • Under 70 – Definite feeble-mindedness

(Wilderdom.com)

p.s. Everyone always wants to know:

  • Einstein is considered to have had an IQ of around 160.
  • Dr. Spencer Reid from Criminal Minds is said to have an IQ of 187.  (wikipedia.com)
  • 115-124 IQ is considered above average! (If you went to University you are above average!)
  • 140-145 IQ is considered where Genius starts and includes 25% of the world’s population. (Good for us!)

Wilderdom.com

In all fairness, I must be honest and admit my slight prejudice against IQ testing and numbers. In particular, I object to the suggestion that IQ is a measurement of a person’s superiority, greater odds of having a successful life, and increased health or happiness.

My father was obsessed with IQ (mostly his own) and spent his entire life seeking recognition for having a high IQ, only keeping company with people of similar IQs and sneering at those who were at lower IQ levels. However, he was a miserable, unhealthy dysfunctional individual.

I have successfully managed to avoid any IQ testing my entire life and am proud not to be one of my late Father’s numbers.

Moving on. There are a few things that caught my eye on this list and prompt me to wonder about the accuracy of the list or perhaps the appropriate requirements for certain occupations:

  • Childcare Workers and Teacher’s aides are almost at the bottom of the list and fall under the “dullness” level of IQ scores! Pardon? These people are responsible for the safety and teaching of our children. Garbage collectors, plasterers, and forklift operators supposedly have higher IQs. This situation has to be wrong on so many levels.
  • If your occupation choice is to stay home with your children and be a homemaker you are considered “dull.” Almost all of the duties of a homemaker coincidentally fall at the low end of the IQ standard.
  • Surgeons have an average IQ of 234.1 and Physicians an average of 161.1. That’s a difference of 73 points! The difference itself represents a number that could equal one person’s IQ itself! I worked in Nursing to get myself through University and got to know a lot of dumb surgeons and brilliant physicians. To keep things polite I will limit myself to saying this has to be a typo.
  • I consider the occupations of Doctor and Corporate Executive as generally potential careers and, therefore, am surprised that they are in the Genius category. I must be very naive because I must say I presumed for some reason that people with Genius IQs would usually have extraordinary and unique occupations.
  • Understandably the vast majority of occupations have only very small deviations in IQ scores and are in the average or normal classification.
  • However…….
  • A Roustabout is listed under the average IQ range along with a lot of other occupations that require different education or training. However, according to Dic.ref.com, a Roustabout is an unskilled labourer who lives by odd jobs. Does this sound like it requires, at least, an average IQ?
  • The average level does need to be subdivided into a lot of smaller categories. Is it feasible that it takes approximately the same amount of intelligence to work as a:
  • Receptionist
  • Butcher
  • Telephone Operator
  • Typist
  • Painter
  • Bus Driver
  • Newspaper Reporter
  • Plasterer
  • Flight Attendant
  • Sheet Metal Worker
  • Insurance Agent
  • Bricklayer
  • Teacher
  • Mail Carrier
  • Anthropologist
  • Registered Nurse
  • Sociologist
  • Chiropractor
  • Veterinarian and…..
  • Psychologist!!!!!

I certainly don’t want my neighbourhood Butcher or Brick Layer doing surgery on my precious pets the same as a veterinarian who has gone through years of schooling. In turn, I don’t want a plasterer administering medical treatment to me like an RN, who again has received years of education.

I’ll let you know from personal experience that a Sheet Metal Worker (my husband started out in this position) is the worst candidate for the occupation of a psychologist or anyone who has to think about anything concerning people’s thinking and emotions.

Please don’t get me wrong, I have a great respect for skilled labours Also I admire those that dedicate themselves to occupations that require much more than my horrible lack of patience and attention span could ever offer.

It’s the basic concept of slotting people into cubby holes based on arbitrary numbers from tests made up by only certain people that I question. I hate focusing on only one element of a person and then naming them that thing. We, as people, are a million different combinations of things and that, in essence, is what makes us, us.